• Extron NetPA Ultra 4-channel Dante amplifier with DSP now shipping

    Extron has announced the availability of the NetPA U 1004 4-channel audio power amplifier. This Dante enabled amplifier delivers 100 watts per channel in a half rack, 1U, convection cooled, plenum rated enclosure that includes rack mount hardware. With the NetPA U 1004, you get the feature set of the company's XPA Ultra amplifiers combined with Dante network audio distribution. These ENERGY STAR qualified amplifiers also offer integrated DSP, allowing a single device to function as a complete audio system endpoint.

    “We knew we’d get strong demand for Dante connectivity on the XPA Ultra amplifiers when those were announced”, says Casey Hall, Vice President of Sales and Marketing. “It’s exciting to fullfil that demand with the NetPA Ultra amplifiers that combine the XPA Ultra technology with Dante audio networking along with integrated DSP for even more flexibility.”

    "NetPA Ultra power amplifiers provide system scalability, easier installation, and simplified wiring, while meeting the stringent quality requirements of professional audio installations."
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    Although it not specific to sound, we include this document with some basic electricity formulas. They can be found in any electricity textbook, but we have added them to the DoPA Library for reference.

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    V
    I = ———
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    V
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