• Pliant MicroCom XR intercom system

    Pliant Technologies has launched its MicroCom XR intercom system, that provides full-duplex, multi-user intercom solutions for applications where high-quality audio, extended range, ease of use, and affordability are essential, says the company. Available in 2.4GHz for worldwide use, as well as 900MHz (where legal), MicroCom XR is a two-channel intercom system that provides up to 10 full-duplex users, a 12-hour (field-replaceable) battery, and extended range.

    The system offers unlimited listeners in addition to duplex users, all without the need for a basestation, providing flexibility for a range of applications. Additionally, MicroCom XR features an easy to read OLED display, a drop-in charger, and is IP67-rated. The system’s rugged, lightweight beltpacks have been built to endure the wear and tear of everyday use as well as the extremes encountered in outdoor environments, according to Pliant.

    MicroCom XR is designed with advanced RF technology for broadcast and production use. In addition, MicroCom XR is compatible with the SmartBoom series of professional headsets, which features the flip-up microphone muting feature, as well as a range of specialty headsets designed for discrete applications.
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