• Lectrosonics Introduces the DCHR Miniature Stereo Digital Receiver

    Lectrosonics is pleased to announce the introduction of the DCHR miniature stereo digital receiver, capable of stereo or mono operation from a single RF carrier with Lectrosonics digital transmitters including the DCHT, M2T, DBu, DHu, and DPR. The unit tunes from 470-614 MHz in the UHF band, covering 6 Lectrosonics blocks and matches the tuning ranges of the digital transmitters in the D Squared, DCH and M2 Duet lines.

    The DCHR is compact and light weight, measuring 76 x 60 x 16 mm (3 x 2.375 x 0.625 inches) and weighing 259 g (9.14 oz.) with batteries installed.

    Setup is reportedly quick and easy with fast RF scans in SmartTune and using IR sync to send settings to the associated transmitter. Manual tuning can also be done using the RF Scan screen, or simply by entering the frequency in the tuning screen. The audio outputs on the TA5 locking connector can be selected in the menu as analog or AES3 format. A 3.5mm stereo headphone jack on the top panel can be used to monitor the receiver audio signals. Detachable SMA-mount antennas are included with the DCHR.

    AES 256-CTR mode encryption is included, with four different encryption key policies available including Universal (common to all Lectrosonics D2, M2X and DCHX units), Shared (great for sports coverage), Standard, and Volatile (one-time use key). Optional accessory cables are available for both analog and AES3 connections to associated equipment. The optional LTBATELIM battery eliminator can be used to power the DCHR with external DC. A USB jack on the side of the unit can be used to update firmware in the field, using the Lectrosonics Wireless Designer software. The DCHR housing is milled from aluminum alloy then specially plated for scratch and corrosion resistance.

    MSRP for the DCHR is: $2,795. Availability: Q4, 2020
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