• PreSonus AVB-D16 brings Dante to StudioLive Series III

    The first plug-and-play endpoint that bridges AVB and Dante networks, the PreSonus AVB-D16 16x16 AVB-to-Dante Bridge enables sending and receiving up to 16 audio channels between PreSonus StudioLive Series III mixers and a Dante network. With one or more AVB-D16s, you can integrate PreSonus StudioLive Series III mixers, NSB-series stage boxes, and EarMix 16M personal monitor mixers with Dante-enabled DSPs and other Dante-enabled products, such as PreSonus CDL-12 constant directivity loudspeakers.

    The AVB-D16 supports AVB audio at 44.1 and 48 kHz and Dante audio at 44.1, 48, 88.2, and 96 kHz. Built-in asynchronous sample-rate conversion ensures that the AVB-D16 provides precision clock isolation between the AVB and Dante networks, says PreSonus. This also allows runnning different sample rates on the AVB and Dante networks, so even if you’re operating a Dante network at 96 kHz, one can still connect streams between your StudioLive Series III AVB network operating at 48 kHz.

    You get one AVB port on a locking etherCON connector and two Dante ports on etherCON for redundant networking. Network Link/Activity Monitor indicators enable you to monitor the data flow.

    Whether you’re looking at your Dante network setup from Audinate’s Dante Control software or managing a StudioLive Series III AVB ecosystem from PreSonus UC Surface control software or a StudioLive Series III console touchscreen, each AVB-D16 presents itself as a simple 16x16 network device. The result is a truly cohesive networking experience between the two protocols.

    The PreSonus AVB-D16 is available immediately at a U.S. street price of $599.95.
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